Union Veterans Blamed for Robberies in Bollinger County

Lancaster Pennsylvania’s Journal Intelligencer newspaper carried news of a string of robberies being committed in Bollinger County, Missouri in its May 29, 1868 issue.

The paper stated that the perpetrators wore masks and Union overcoats and stated it was probably some of “Logan’s GAR’s

Sons of (Union) Veterans Arrested in Marble Hill.

The date was May 30, 1889 and both Union and Confederate veterans gathered in Marble Hill, Missouri to join in a memorial to those who had died in the Civil War. The July 11, 1889 edition of the Erie Sentinel reported that Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #50 fired the salute (with blank cartridges). Afterwards the Union and Confederate veterans went to the Bollinger County courthouse to continue the service. It was at this time that the members who fired the salute, brought their rifles in the courthouse and were arrested because of it.

Deadly Storm Cost Lives, Injuries

The June 1, 1917 edition of the Natchez Democrat (Natchez, Mississippi) reported on the deadly storms that passed through Southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois. The paper reported that the storm did the most damage in Wayne and Bollinger Counties, with the heaviest loss in Zalma where 25 lives were lost and 200 injured. Deadly StormContinue reading “Deadly Storm Cost Lives, Injuries”

Missouri Governor Claiborne Fox: Secessionist or Peacemaker?

Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson became a secessionist, only when he had no other choice and should be remembered as a Governor who tried to keep Missouri out of the war.

The Bollinger County Light Horse Cavalry

It may be significant to note that the Bollinger County Light Horse Cavalry was the first Confederate unit organized in this neighborhood, in mid-March of 1861, which was nearly a month before the South attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina on April 12, 1861.

A Desperate Plea (And Warning) From A Friend

The August 31, 1861 issue of Louisville, Kentucky’s “Courier Journal” carried a story on the conditions of Bollinger & Madison counties in Missouri. It also contains a letter from I.R. Hidod, of Company G, Missouri State Guard to his friend, Francis Williams. The letter was a plea from Hidod to Williams to his position as a Union man and enlist in the ranks of the South. The letter was also a warning as to what would happen if he didn’t.

Did the Missouri Convention REALLY Rule Out Secession

The Daily Exchange [Baltimore, Md] newspaper’s March 25, 1861 issue carried news of the Missouri State Convention held on February 28th with the curious language that Missouri denied, “The legal right of secession” but recognized, “the right of revolution.”

New Marketplace: Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition

“A fascinating story of conflict played out in a country of great beauty but thin soil, heavy swamps, thick forest that almost nobody wanted, except the people who lived there.” – Paulette Jiles, author of “Enemy Women”, “News of the World” & “Simon the Fiddler”.

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Argument Between Elderly Confederate Veterans Ended in Knife Fight at Higginsville

The two combatants were Mose Scott (age 86) and Jim Cummings (78). Cummings was the last surviving member of Quantrill’s Raiders and was said to have been well acquainted with the James Brothers (Frank & Jesse) as well as the Youngers and the Coles (which the paper refers to as “pioneer outlaws of the Ozarks.”