Deadly Storm Cost Lives, Injuries

The June 1, 1917 edition of the Natchez Democrat (Natchez, Mississippi) reported on the deadly storms that passed through Southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois. The paper reported that the storm did the most damage in Wayne and Bollinger Counties, with the heaviest loss in Zalma where 25 lives were lost and 200 injured.

Deadly Storm at Zalma, Missouri. June 1,1917Deadly Storm at Zalma, Missouri. June 1,1917 Fri, Jun 1, 1917 – Page 1 · Natchez Democrat (Natchez, Mississippi) · Newspapers.com
  • Clint Lacy is an author and publisher and founded Foothills Media LLC in February, 2019. His latest release is “The Rape of Delaware County.” Oklahoma used to be a safe haven for outlaws, in Delaware County it still is. The only difference is that some of them wear badges and others have law degrees. $10 paperback, 145 pages.

A Desperate Plea (And Warning) From A Friend

The St. Louis Massacre (also known as the Camp Jackson Affair ) which occurred on Friday May 10, 1861, in St. Louis, saw members of the Missouri State Guard taken prisoner by Union troops (the majority of which were German immigrants). As the troops were marching the Missourians through the streets, the crowd became enraged and the Union troops began to fire into it, killing 28 civilians, including an infant.

This was Missouri’s “Fort Sumter” and citizens who were once “on the fence” began to quickly choose sides. After the event Germans were looked upon with great suspicion.

The August 31, 1861 issue of Louisville, Kentucky’s “Courier Journal” carried a story on the conditions of Bollinger & Madison counties in Missouri. It also contains a letter from I.R. Hidod, of Company G, Missouri State Guard to his friend, Francis Williams. The letter was a plea from Hidod to Williams to reconsider his position as a Union man and enlist in the ranks of the South. The letter was also a warning as to what would happen if he didn’t.

Want to learn more about the Civil War in the Southeast Missouri Ozarks? Buy “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” $15 paperback / $2.99 Kindle.

The Laflin Store

The Snider Store in Laflin, Missouri on Bollinger County Rd #450

I took this photo of the Laflin Store in July, 2017. If one looks at it long enough they can see a hint of the once prosperous establishment that still remains. That being said, there’s also no denying that the structure is “on borrowed time”.

I found an advertisement for the store in a copy of the January 14, 1904 issue of the Marble Hill Press and thought it would be a good way to show the contrast between the dying state of existence of the store now through this photo and the working establishment it used to be through the advertisement.

Advertisement for the Snider Store, published in the January 14, 1904 issue of the Marble Hill Press.
  • Clint Lacy is the author of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” & “A Beginner’s Guide to False Flags: The Deep State Agenda Behind America’s Biggest Events” which can be found by visiting Our Products page.

More on Will Mayfield College

Will Mayfield College located in Marble Hill, Missouri

This is a follow up post to one I published on January 15, 2020 which states, in part that:

“The Will Mayfield College began as the Mayfield-Smith Academy in Sedgewickville (originally called Smithville), Missouri in 1878. In 1880 the school was moved to Marble Hill.

“The new campus was in a healthful location with “pure water” and “beneficial zephyrs.”  In addition, it was free of the vice associated with larger towns. The first main building—Academic Hall—was completed in 1885.  In 1903 the name of the school was changed to Will Mayfield College to honor the son of the founder.”(2)

The college was mainly known for producing teachers and at one point produced more teachers than any state college in Missouri.  Though successful the college’s demise came in the form of a fire destroying the women’s dormitory in 1926 and later the Great Depression.”

An article I discovered in the May 19, 1892 issue of the Marble Hill Press shows that the institution was highly respected, though it appeared to be struggling. The paper reported:

” A large number of people were out to enjoy the excellent entertainment and manifest a due appreciation of the laudable work of Professor E. R. Graham who has had charge of this institution for the past term. He has been laboring under disadvantages that would have discouraged most men, nevertheless his work has been successful to a marked degree.”

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More on Murder in Marble Hill

Missouri Governor Charles Henry Hardin (1875-1877)

This is a short follow up to my January 29, 2020 post entitled “Murder in Marble Hill!” which covered the story of William Pents who was publicly hanged in April , 1877.

The April 30, 1877 Cincinnati Daily Star reported:

“Wm. Pintz [Ed. Note Pents], who killed Catherine Burr, a child about nine years in Bollinger County, Missouri, on the 15th of May, 1875 was hanged at Marble Hill Friday, before a great crowd of people, who came for many miles to witness the execution. Pintz confessed that he killed the girl, and had also murdered a man named William Gray, for which he was paid $10″

Apparently Pents was scheduled to be executed before this date but was given a temporary reprieve by Missouri Governor Charles Henry Hardin. The January 14, 1876 issue of The State Journal [Jefferson City, Missouri] reported:

“The Governor has respited William Pents, of Bollinger county, sentenced to be hanged on the 14th of this month, until the 11th of February next. Pents was convicted of the murder of a little girl while gathering grapes in the
woods, last fall. Judge, prosecuting attorneys, jurors and a number of citizens petition for a commutation. No doubt as to guilt but think Pents is crazy. Respite Issued In order to examine evidence as to insanity, and if he h is mind enough to understand the consequences of his crime when committed, he will hang but if only an idiot, may commute sentence.”

Crazy or not, William Pents was publicly hanged in April of 1877 in Marble Hill, Missouri.

More on Sheriff Rogers

The February 15th, 1867 issue of the Tama Republican Newspaper (Toledo , Iowa) carries the news of Sheriff James Rogers arresting a local preacher.

In my previous article “Who Murdered the Patterson Family” I made the connection between Bollinger County Sheriff James Rogers (1866-68) and the murder of the Patterson family in Bollinger County, Missouri during the Civil War. Rogers was charged with murder while acting as sheriff, for war crimes he previously committed. In my previous post I stated that there could be no doubt that Sheriff James Rogers was a criminal but apparently the Sheriff hated all things moral.

The February 15, 1867 issue of the Tama County Republican newspaper (Toledo, Iowa) carried the news of an act so embarrassing that Sheriff Rogers felt the need to explain it to the public. It was so embarrassing that the Sheriff opted to inform the public through a card (insert) in the local Cape Girardeau, Missouri paper. According to the Tama County Republican:

“James Rogers, sheriff of Bollinger county, Mo. publishes “A Card” in the Cape Girardeau News, under the head of “New Advertisements,’ (we suppose the editor was ashamed to have it seen in this reading matter) defending his conduct for having arrested a preacher. Mr Rogers can make himself easy on that point his services are no longer needed in that line
the Supreme Court has taken the preacher under its wing, and says, in thc language of the old camp-meeting hymn,
We do declare, without a doubt,
That Christians have a right to shout;
O, glory, glory, hallelujah !”

  • Clint Lacy is the author of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” and “A Beginner’s Guide to False Flags: The Deep State Agenda Behind America’s Biggest Events” which are available in both paperback and Kindle formats and can be purchased on Our Products page.