An Example of a Different Time

The March 14, 1929 Greenville Sun newspaper [Greenville, Missouri] contained a story that would spark outrage by today’s standards. The headline read “Nigger Minstrel Saturday Night” which announced a comedy show which featured “The Black Face Boys” and guaranteed that the performance would make each and every audience member “forget their troubles.”

Of course this was a much different time in American history. A time in which “black face” performances were a popular and accepted form of comedy.

Thu, Mar 14, 1929 – 1 · Greenville Sun (Greenville, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

The Fate of Adam Bollinger

In my previous post I talked about Adam Bollinger a former slave who was arrested for the murder of a fellow slave in 1862.

This was a unique case in Missouri courts as Bollinger offered a brilliant defense stating that if he was considered property in 1862, how could one piece of property murder another piece of property?

I had not found what fate befell Adam Bollinger but thanks to an inquisitive reader we now have the answer!

According to the Case Law Access Project at Harvard Law School:

“The State’s Bight of Appeal in Criminal Cases. Where a motion in arrest of judgment in a criminal case has been sustained, and the prisoner ordered discharged, on the ground that at the time of the commission of the offense the defendant was a slave, and as such not liable to punishment, the State cannot appeal. Her right of appeal.is limited to those cases, where, either on motion to quash, on demurrer or on motion in arrest of judgment, the indictment has been adjudged to b.e insufficient either in form or substance. *578Appeal from, Madison Circuit Court. — Hon. ¥m. N. Nalle, ■Judge. J. L. Smith, Attorney-General, for the State. Duchouquette § Fox for respondent.” State v. Bollinger, 69 Mo. 577 (1879)”

Thank You to our helpful reader!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

More Gold in Southeast Missouri

From the February 4, 1862 Daily Missouri Democrat

I posted an article on January 28, 2020 in which I talked about gold discovered in Dallas (present day Marble Hill) Bollinger County, Missouri in 1866. Recently I discovered that gold has been found elsewhere in Southeast Missouri in 1862. The February 4, 1862 issue of The Daily Missouri Democrat contains information about the discovery of gold in neighboring Madison County, Missouri.

I don’t know if the evidence of gold in the area ever resulted in any additional prospecting but I am confident that further research of the archives of the time will result in more information of the subject.

Below is the (very lengthy) article.

Gold discovered in Madison County, MissouriGold discovered in Madison County, Missouri Tue, Feb 4, 1862 – 1 · The Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com Gold discovered in Madison County, Missouri: Part 2Gold discovered in Madison County, Missouri: Part 2 Tue, Feb 4, 1862 – 1 · The Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

Shop titles from Foothills Media by visiting Our Products page.

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

More on Will Mayfield College

On the September 13, 1929 the Republic Tribune (Union, Missouri) carried a lengthy article about the Will Mayfield College stating that:

“Due to hard times in the Mississippi Valley the Will Mayfield College of Marble Hill, Missouri had some hard struggles this last year and there was some doubt in the minds of many as to the future of Will Mayfield.”

Despite the doubt of many about the forthcoming year the headline of the paper read “Will Mayfield College Opened With Fine Attendance.”

Will Mayfield College, Marble Hill, MoWill Mayfield College, Marble Hill, Mo Fri, Sep 13, 1929 – Page 4 · Republican Tribune (Union, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

The Last of the Moonshiners

The July 13, 1878 St. Louis Globe-Democrat published an article entitled “The Last of the Moonshiners” about John Bollinger, a moonshiner who was over 70 years of age. Bollinger might have been in “advanced age” as the paper describes him, but he still had plenty of fight left in him. The paper stated , “When captured Bollinger was very violent in his language toward the officers and swore that if he had been at the distillery when they came they never would have taken it; he would have shot them down like dogs.”

Last of the Moonshiners in Bollinger CountyLast of the Moonshiners in Bollinger County Sat, Jul 13, 1878 – 7 · St. Louis Globe-Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

More Post-War Lawlessness in Bollinger County, Missouri

In post-war Bollinger County, Missouri lawlessness prevailed. It seems with little opportunity many turned to distilling corn liquor or “moonshine”. Before the war it was not illegal to do so but after the war it was considered to be against the law due to the fact that the government did not get “its share” through taxation.

There are several accounts in newspaper archives from throughout the United States about the crackdown on illegal distilleries in the county. It was not uncommon for federal authorities to make appearances and arrests.

It was also not uncommon for the citizens to intervene in the apprehension of moonshiners. Sometimes they were successful, other times not so much. The May 22, 1871 issue of the Chicago Tribune carries the story of an unsuccessful attempt to free prisoners from Federal authorities.

Post War Lawlessness in Bollinger County, MissouriPost War Lawlessness in Bollinger County, Missouri Mon, May 22, 1871 – 2 · Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) · Newspapers.com Mon, May 22, 1871 – 2 · Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) · Newspapers.com

In Post-War Bollinger County, Republicans Weren’t Welcome

One account of Bollinger County, Missouri during the Civil War called it a “hotbed of secession”, Historian Glen Bishop, (whose speech at the Bollinger County Museum of Natural History was covered in the September 4, 2011 Southeast Missourian Newspaper) stated that 6 out of 10 men in Bollinger County sided with the South during the war.

Not surprisingly, many of these men either fled the state or lost their property during the war. A common practice was to claim back taxes owned on the land that were not paid during the hostilities. When the land owners couldn’t pay, they county took the land. In other instances during the war men who were charged with being Southern sympathizers would have to take an “Oath of Allegiance” and put up a bond. If the accused did not have the cash for the bond, they were allowed to use their property. In the event they were accused of disloyalty again, the property was forfeited and often time the accused sent to prison.

It is important to remember that during and after the War most Southerners were Democrats and most Unionists were Republican, of course most Southerners could not hold office or vote until the Drake Constitution (which served as the basis for Missouri Reconstruction) was abolished in 1875.

By 1872 land in Bollinger County could be found advertised in papers throughout the United States but as some would find out, the land was not much of a bargain. Evidence of this can be found in the August 5, 1872 Inter Ocean newspaper (Chicago, Illinois) and the August 8, 1872 Boston Globe (both articles being republished from the St. Louis Globe).

Republicans intimidated in Bollinger CountyRepublicans intimidated in Bollinger County Mon, Aug 5, 1872 – Page 6 · The Inter Ocean (Chicago, Illinois) · Newspapers.com KKK Intimidation, Bollinger County, MissouriKKK Intimidation, Bollinger County, Missouri Thu, Aug 8, 1872 – 4 · The Boston Globe (Boston, Massachusetts) · Newspapers.com

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Union Veterans Blamed for Robberies in Bollinger County

Lancaster, Pennsylvania’s Journal Intelligencer newspaper carried news of a string of robberies being committed in Bollinger County, Missouri in its May 29, 1868 issue.

The paper stated that the perpetrators wore masks and Union overcoats and stated it was probably some of “Logan’s GAR’s”.

Union War Veterans Blamed for Robberies in Bollinger County, MissouriUnion War Veterans Blamed for Robberies in Bollinger County, Missouri Fri, May 29, 1868 – 2 · Intelligencer Journal (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) · Newspapers.com

I knew who “Logan” was. The paper was referencing Union General John A. Logan (from Southern Illinois), he founded the Grand Army of the Republic in 1868, which was a fraternal organization for Union veterans of the Civil War.

At first I thought the “Logan” reference was to a local GAR chapter in Bollinger County but I can find no record, there were to GAR chapters in Bollinger County, Missouri, the Shanks chapter in Lutesville / Marble Hill and the Pape chapter in Zalma.

The paper in its statement that the robbers were probably some of “Logan’s GAR’s was a reference to the organization in general. Army History {.org} states that:

“Following the Civil War, Logan was instrumental in the founding of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), a veterans group comprised of former Union Army soldiers, and served as the GAR’s second elected national commander; General Stephen Hurlburt was the first commander in chief of the GAR.  On 3 March 1868, Logan issued General Order No. 11, which called for a national day of remembrance for Civil War dead.  This order served as the basis for what became the national holiday of Memorial Day.”

General John A. Logan, a veteran of the Union army and founder of the G.A.R.

New Marketplace: Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition

$15 at Barnes & Noble

Drumroll please… “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” is now available at Barnes & Noble for $15.00 (paperback).

“A fascinating story of conflict played out in a country of great beauty but thin soil, heavy swamps, thick forest that almost nobody wanted, except the people who lived there.”Paulette Jiles, author of “Enemy Women”, “News of the World” & “Simon the Fiddler”.

Special Offers & New Platforms

Foothills Media LLC is always looking for new market places and platforms in order to reach more potential customers and bring you more savings.

Recently I discovered Flip HTML 5, it is a platform that serves as an e-commerce site for authors and a marketplace for savvy ebook customers.

We’re proud to announce that we have uploaded “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” to Flip HTML 5 for just $1.50! All payments safely and securely made through Paypal. Click Here to order and read the first 20 pages free.