About Those Official Numbers

Most “official” sources claim that 110,000 Missouri men fought for the Union and some 30,000 fought for the Confederacy.

I’ve always questioned these figures for several reason:

1: Does this number include Union soldiers from neighboring states whose units were designated as “Missouri” units?

2: Does this number include the number of Missouri men who fought for the South in “irregular” or “partisan” units?

3. Does this number include Missouri men who were forced to join Enrolled Missouri Militia units or face jail time for “desertion”?

I’m guessing this number does not include the number of Southern men forced to join Union militia units and then fled with their newly furnished weapons.

I have stumbled across an example from the latter group in the September 21, 1865 issue of The Weekly Free Press (Atchison, Ks). An article in the paper reports that an election was held in Salem, Dent County, Missouri for the purpose of electing officers of a unit of Missouri Militia (Union) and that after the election the new company of Union militia celebrated by getting drunk, riding out of town and shouting for the Southern Confederacy.

Union Militia shouts for the ConfederacyUnion Militia shouts for the Confederacy Thu, Sep 21, 1865 – 4 · The Weekly Free Press (Atchison, Kansas) · Newspapers.com Thu, Sep 21, 1865 – 4 · The Weekly Free Press (Atchison, Kansas) · Newspapers.com

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St. Louis Globe Democrat Paid Tribute to Will Mayfield & Bollinger County, Missouri

The August 23, 1925 issue of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat covered the counties of Southeast Missouri in its “Travelog” series of the state. Included in the article is a substantial article about Bollinger County and William Mayfield, who the Globe described as “the County’s leading citizen” and “after many hearbreaking experiences and tribulations finally succeeded in founding the Will Mayfield College there.”

The Globe, in its coverage of the counted also painted a picture of what it was like to live in the county during the Civil War.

http://www.foothillsmedia.net
Bollinger County, Will MayfieldBollinger County, Will Mayfield Sun, Aug 23, 1925 – 19 · St. Louis Globe-Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

Will Mayfield Part. 2Will Mayfield Part. 2 Sun, Aug 23, 1925 – 19 · St. Louis Globe-Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com Mayfield Part. 3Mayfield Part. 3 Sun, Aug 23, 1925 – 19 · St. Louis Globe-Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) · Newspapers.com

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Thar’s Gold in Marble Hill!

A newspaper clipping from the May 26, 1866 Charleston Daily News

Apparently gold was discovered in Marble Hill, Missouri. The source of the news comes from the May 26, 1866 Charleston Daily News (Charleston, S.C.) and at the time Marble Hill was called “Dallas”.

According to the paper a rock which served as part of the foundation of a house that had been burned during the Civil War. The paper states that when the rock was ground up $60 worth of gold was refined from it. The paper also reported that the rock came from a local quarry just outside of town.

This is the first time this writer has ever heard of gold being discovered in the Southeast Missouri Ozark Foothills of Bollinger County, Missouri and as far as I know this was the only time gold was ever discovered here.

Just Released: Blood in the Ozarks- Expanded Second Edition

Foothills Media LLC is pleased to announce the release of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition”

Deep in the Ozarks of Southeast Missouri a battle still raises about a massacre committed on Christmas Day, 1863 in Ripley County, Missouri by members of the 3’rd Missouri State Militia Cavalry led by Major James Wilson. While naysayers state that the “massacre” was nothing more than a rescue mission to free Union troops captured days before by Colonel Timothy Reeves and his 15th Missouri Cavalry, CSA, local historical documents, newspaper articles and military records prove bias on their part, painting a picture of a government cover up and the needless slaughter of men, women and children along with Confederate soldiers on the holiest day of the year. In this Expanded Second Edition the reader will find more photos, newspaper archives and other sources of information that paints a clearer picture of this tragedy.

More information, more photos at a more affordable price!

$15 paperback / $2.99 Kindle