Black Panthers’ Existence Confirmed in the Press of the Past

Later one bright summer morning I saw the big cat crossing the valley field. He was black, about the size of a young calf but longer and slimmer with shorter legs. He did not run but bounded along with cat-like leaps…”

Great Excitement in Greenville

The February 17, 1927 edition of the Greenville Sun newspaper carried the story of a fiddling contest that attracted more than 600 people to the Wayne County, Missouri community more than 200 people were turned away , failing to gain admission to the event.

Bloody Work in Southeast Missouri

The May 24, 1861 edition of the Alexandria Gazette & Virginia Advertiser carried the news of a gang operating in Butler County, Missouri. This is a particularly interesting account for two reasons:

The first is the fact that the Civil War (for the most part) had not yet arrived in Southeast, Missouri.

The second is that the paper states the gang’s leader was from Indiana

Using the Term “Bushwhacker” to Deflect Blame

“My mother’s grandfather, Jonas Myers served in the Confederate Army and was killed in Northeast Arkansas after the conflict ended while on his way home to Bollinger County in Southeast Missouri. Some accounts say that he and several other local men on their return journey were robbed and then lined up and executed by so-called bushwhackers, lawless men who preyed on both sides.