Argument Between Elderly Confederate Veterans Ended in Knife Fight at Higginsville

The two combatants were Mose Scott (age 86) and Jim Cummings (78). Cummings was the last surviving member of Quantrill’s Raiders and was said to have been well acquainted with the James Brothers (Frank & Jesse) as well as the Youngers and the Coles (which the paper refers to as “pioneer outlaws of the Ozarks.”

Black Panthers’ Existence Confirmed in the Press of the Past

Later one bright summer morning I saw the big cat crossing the valley field. He was black, about the size of a young calf but longer and slimmer with shorter legs. He did not run but bounded along with cat-like leaps…”

Civil War Lecture

Today’s Banner Press newspaper carried the story of Wayne Klinckhardt of Marble Hill , Missouri who spoke at the February 29, 2020 Stoddard Rangers Camp #2290 , Sons of Confederate Veterans as part of their Civil War in Missouri Lecture Series held at the historic Stars and Stripes Museum and Library in Bloomfield, Missouri.

Great Excitement in Greenville

The February 17, 1927 edition of the Greenville Sun newspaper carried the story of a fiddling contest that attracted more than 600 people to the Wayne County, Missouri community more than 200 people were turned away , failing to gain admission to the event.

Harry B. Hawes: Pioneer of Missouri’s Highway & Flood Control Systems

Hawes authored bills that created the Missouri Highway Department and revised state traffic laws. He also served as chairman of the Good Roads committee and led the effort to pass a $60 million bond issue for creation of the states first highway system. Pertaining to river transportation and its importance to Missouri, Hawes was one of the chief organizers of the “Lakes to the Gulf Waterway Association”

Slavery Was Not the Cause of the War: Another Example

While exploring the archives of the Charleston Courier (Charleston, Mississippi County, Missouri) I found another example of Northern views regarding slavery and whether or not Union soldiers were fighting to abolish the institution.

Murder in Mississippi County…

Since the Heard family did not all die at the same time I can only speculate what happened. Was it starvation? The flooding? Sickness? Or did a rogue element of militia from one side or the other take them out one by one? I’m not sure but it certainly seems systematic in nature and something I will continue to research.

Dr. Frank Nickell: Causes of the Civil War

On January 25, 2020 Dr. Frank Nickell was the guest speaker at the Stoddard Rangers Camp #2290 Sons of Confederate Veterans January meeting as part of the camp’s Civil War in Missouri Lecture Series. The event was held at the historic Stars and Stripes Museum in Bloomfield, Missouri. Dr. Nickell spoke to a capacity audienceContinue reading “Dr. Frank Nickell: Causes of the Civil War”

Bloody Work in Southeast Missouri

The May 24, 1861 edition of the Alexandria Gazette & Virginia Advertiser carried the news of a gang operating in Butler County, Missouri. This is a particularly interesting account for two reasons:

The first is the fact that the Civil War (for the most part) had not yet arrived in Southeast, Missouri.

The second is that the paper states the gang’s leader was from Indiana

Wayne Klinckhardt to Speak at Civil War in Missouri Lecture Series

Mr. Klinckhardt is the author of “War for Missouri” and a U. S. Air Force veteran serving 1966-1970 as an intelligence analyst, nine months in TX, one year at the end of the Aleutian Islands and the balance of his time at the NSA. Mr. Klinckhardt holds an MBA from Lindenwood College. He took an interest in CW history at an early age.