Part Three of My Appearance on the Conspiracy Unlimited Podcast with Richard Syrett.

In Part Three of an ongoing series, Richard welcomes Clint Lacy,an author to discuss False Flag operations throughout U.S. history, including the assassination of JFK, The Gulf of Tonkin Incident, and the attack on the USS Liberty. “A Beginner’s Guide to False Flags: The Deep State Agena Behind America’s Biggest Events” can be purchased by Clicking This Link ($15 paperback / $4.99 Kindle format.)

More on Will Mayfield College

Will Mayfield College located in Marble Hill, Missouri

This is a follow up post to one I published on January 15, 2020 which states, in part that:

“The Will Mayfield College began as the Mayfield-Smith Academy in Sedgewickville (originally called Smithville), Missouri in 1878. In 1880 the school was moved to Marble Hill.

“The new campus was in a healthful location with “pure water” and “beneficial zephyrs.”  In addition, it was free of the vice associated with larger towns. The first main building—Academic Hall—was completed in 1885.  In 1903 the name of the school was changed to Will Mayfield College to honor the son of the founder.”(2)

The college was mainly known for producing teachers and at one point produced more teachers than any state college in Missouri.  Though successful the college’s demise came in the form of a fire destroying the women’s dormitory in 1926 and later the Great Depression.”

An article I discovered in the May 19, 1892 issue of the Marble Hill Press shows that the institution was highly respected, though it appeared to be struggling. The paper reported:

” A large number of people were out to enjoy the excellent entertainment and manifest a due appreciation of the laudable work of Professor E. R. Graham who has had charge of this institution for the past term. He has been laboring under disadvantages that would have discouraged most men, nevertheless his work has been successful to a marked degree.”

  • Clint Lacy is author of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” & “A Beginner’s Guide to False Flags: The Deep State Agenda Behind America’s Biggest Events” which can be purchased by visiting OUR PRODUCTS page.

Respect Escaped Leeper

William Leeper of Wayne County, Missouri

By all accounts William T. Leeper was an ambitious man. Through my research a picture begins to form of him. He was a man who desired to be a man of means, someone of prominence, of importance, a man of authority. In this picture are shadows of darkness, which if examined closely, reveal a man who was willing to do anything to achieve these goals. He was a driven man who chased his dreams with reckless abandon.

The official narrative for Leeper can be found in “Wayne County Place Names 1928-1945” archived at the Missouri State Historical Society which states:

“Colonel William T. Leeper moved to Wayne County in 1857 and purchased 225 acres of land. In 1858 he was elected County Surveyor and served until the beginning of the Civil War. He organized Company D. of the Twelfth Regiment of Missouri Militia and was made captain.”

That is a sanitized summary of the man. In a previous post I quoted a story from the Wayne County Historical Society about Leeper which states:

“History has not ignored Leeper’s methods or actions. In an account published in the Wayne County Journal Banner and shared on the Wayne County Historical Society’s social media page on August 1, 2018 , Captain William Leeper’s actions while he was in the 12’th Missouri Militia Cavalry (the 3’rd’s predecessor ) so much so that Leeper is labeled the “Chief Jayhawker” himself.

“Captain Leeper, I have no doubt, is wishing to merit and obtain a higher command than he now holds”. This was sent from Greenville and dated February 27, 1862, eleven days after the [Greenville] raid. A telegraph to General Gray at Pilot Knob was sent from Patterson soon thereafter. It read; “I have ordered Captain Leeper of CO B to Pilot Knob. Keep him and learn him to be a soldier”. One historian previously wrote about Leeper: “Captain Leeper’s methods of ferreting out and interrogating men to determine their loyalties were direct and brutal. He was known to shoot anything that moved and burn anything that would light. In February 1863 (almost exactly a year since the Greenville raid), Leeper and the 12th Missouri Militia participated in what was called by some “The Battle of Mingo Swamp” and by others as the “Mingo Swamp Massacre.” The McGee boys had just left the confederate army and returned home; ironically, to protect their home from Captain Leeper’s reign of terror. The McGee’s and their friends, the Cato’s sat unarmed at their camp at the McGee home when they were set upon in the early hours of February 4, 1863 by Captain Leeper and his “militia”. All 29 men were mercilessly gunned down in a barrage of gunfire. Captain Leeper’s report differs somewhat in that he reports “engaging a Union camp” on this date”.

 This account of Leeper is significant as it details his brutality (calling him the “Chief Jayhawker”) but also his gaffs. In this account , a quote of one of Leeper’s after action reports calls attention to Leeper referring to a Confederate camp as a “Union” camp.

Another instance can be found in Ivan McKee’s book “Lost Family, Lost Cause” which states:

“Some of the letters he wrote seem almost pathetic and his hatred must have bordered on the ruminations of a paranoid mind. An example: He had seen a report of a black Union group of soldiers in the general area. He wrote that he would like to see southern chivalry subdued by the African, and continued on that he would like to make a “flank” movement with black soldiers . The term, flank movement, as he used it showed unfortunately he had little or no concept of what a flank movement is in military tactics.”

Another , more humorous account of William T. Leeper’s gaffs , or Leeperisms (as I call them) can be found in the Wednesday February 28, 1872 , Lexington Intelligencer newspaper (which also shows how others viewed him), when Leeper was a Missouri State Representative.

The paper states that Leeper moved to amend everything and would move to amend the decalogue were it introduced in the House and that:

“The business of the House in particular would be greatly facilitated, if not improved, were some three or four [representatives] at home or bereft of speech.”

All of which prove that while that while William T. Leeper was willing to go to most any lengths to achieve success and become a man of means he was unable to achieve what he most wanted from many of his contemporaries, which was respect.

Clint Lacy is author of Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition which is available in Paperback for $15 and Kindle format for $2.99. It can be ordered by clicking this link or the image above.

James Gang Spotted In Bollinger County

This article was originally published by State of the Ozarks online magazine.

The Methodist Episcopal Church South located a mile from Marble Hill, Missouri.

John Reilly spotted Jesse and Frank James camping “at the foot of the hill just beyond ‘Uncle’ David Lutes’ residence about one-and-one-half mile west of Lutesville [Bollinger County, Missouri].” It was the night after the James Gang’s first train robbery. The holdup occurred near Gad’s Hill, Wayne County, Missouri, on January 31, 1874.

Reilly’s story was printed in the Marble Hill Press newspaper on July 9, 1891.

Not long ago, my good friend Scotty Hooe and I discussed the possible locations of that James Gang campsite as it was possible the occurrence took place on Scotty’s Lucky Valley Ranch.

The late Scotty Hooe.

The ranch is approximately one-and-one-half miles west of old Lutesville and there is an old well there. The well would have made an ideal camp. Scotty began researching property abstracts and found the land once belonged to David Lutes.

We pored over the abstracts carefully and what I found next led me to believe Scotty’s land was indeed the James Gang’s 1874 camp location. The land’s history is fascinating.

Capped off well located on Lucky Valley Ranch

It is a parcel with a boundary line of the north bank of Opossum Creek. Jacob Lutes’ name appears on the abstracts, dated April 10, 1849 (on a document signed by President Zachary Taylor and Secretary of the Interior Thomas Ewing).

Ewing’s signature is ironic.

Jacob Lutes was a rider in the Bollinger County Light Horse Cavalry. He was a Confederate.

Secretary of the Interior Ewing was father of General Thomas Ewing Jr., the infamous Union general who authored Order #11 — the order displacing thousands of Missourians in an attempt to route Confederate sympathizers.

General Ewing also commanded Fort Davidson in nearby Pilot Knob, Missouri, when Confederate General Price attacked in 1864.

Did Jacob Lutes’ Confederate ties play a role in Frank and Jesse James’ decision to choose the Lutes’ land as a campsite? The nearby Methodist Episcopal Church South was a known safe haven for Confederate soldiers. The apparent coincidences are stirring.

My friend Scotty Hooe’s personal ties to the Confederacy are stirring as well.

Grounds of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The church was located on a small hillside known as Point Pleasant.

Scotty is related to General Robert E. Lee. Virginia Hooe-Mason married Wilmer McLean in 1854. McClean was a cousin to Lee. Civil War history buffs might recognize the man’s home: the Mclean House in the village of Appomattox Court House where, on April 9, 1865, the surrender of the Confederacy took place.

Of course, here in Missouri the war did not truly end until 1882 when Jesse James was betrayed and shot by Bob Ford.

FEBRUARY 10, 2016.

– Clint Lacy is author of Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Edition available in paperback $15 or Kindle $2.99

More Murder in Wayne County!

The Saturday May 28, 1881 Fair Play newspaper (St. Genevieve , Missouri) reported the murder of New Madrid County, Missouri Deputy Sheriff Robert LaForge by three individuals who then made their way to Wayne County, Missouri at which time they murdered Sheriff John T. Davis and mortally wounded County Collector James F. Hatten.

The paper also reports that William T. Leeper formed a posse killing one of the perpetrators and mortally wounding another. Below is a clipping of the full account.

  • Clint Lacy is the author of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition” and ” A Beginner’s Guide to False Flags: The Deep State Agenda Behind America’s Biggest Events” which can be purchased by visiting Our Products page.

Murder in Mill Spring!

The post office at Mill Spring Missouri, which closed in 2014. Photo by Kathy Weiser-Alexander.

No matter one thinks of William T. Leeper (good or bad) there is no denying that he played a pivotal role in the development of Wayne County, Missouri, during the years following the Civil War.

One of the towns Leeper was instrumental in founding was Mill Spring on the Black River. The Legends of America website published a feature article on Mill Spring which states:

“Mill Spring, Missouri, located along the Black River in Wayne County, in the southeast portion of the state got its start as a railroad and logging town.

One of the first residents in the area was Captain William T. Leeper, who would become one of the most prominent men of Wayne County. Raised in Tennessee, he moved to the area in 1857 and purchased 225 acres of land. The next year, he was elected county surveyor, a position he held until the Civil War broke out. He then organized Company D, Twelfth Regiment, of the Missouri State Militia, of which he became captain.

After he returned from the war, he represented Wayne County in the State Legislature, during which time he influenced the St. Louis, Iron Mountain, and Southern Railway to extend their line through Piedmont to Mill Spring and then to Williamsville, rather than the original planned route through Patterson and Greenville. As an incentive, he donated a right-of-way through his land and even though this route required a cut through two mountains, the railroad agreed.”

It was during this time of railroad expansion that Mill Spring saw a large influx of workers who were traveling with the railroad. It is also this time that a bar room brawl ended in murder in this Wayne County hamlet.

The event was described in the Sunday March 4, 1888 issue of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat which reported the following:

Clint Lacy is the author of “Blood in the Ozarks: Expanded Second Edition available in Paperback, $15 and Kindle format, $2.99 which can be ordered by clicking THIS LINK.